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sassytaco:

It never has.
Amen
SEND ME A FANDOM

harrypotterconfessions:

 I’ll tell you:

The first character I first fell in love with: 
The character I never expected to love as much as I do now: 
The character everyone else loves that I don’t: 
The character I love that everyone else hates: 
The character I used to love but don’t any longer:
The character I would totally smooch: 
The character I’d want to be like: 
The character I’d slap: 
A pairing that I love:
A pairing that I despise: 

Yass

gnarly:

I would be a morning person, if morning happened around 1pm

phrexthemariogamer:

Have you ever notice Mario in Brawl never smiled once and if you compare him with Mario in Melee its like “is this the same plumber?”

thehumanbutt:

stop-fallen-angel:

awwww-cute:

Found this little guy outside of a Mexican restaurant last night. His name is Queso

THAT THING LOOKS LIKE A DEMON, WHY WOULD YOU NAME HIM AFTER CHEESE?

IT IS OBVIOUSLY A BLACK FLOOF AND HAS/WILL NEVER HURT A SOUL. DID YOU EVEN LOOK AT IT?!???!

bikinipowerbottom:

"She’s really pretty for a black girl"

image


“He’s really cool for a gay guy”

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“She’s doing really well for a woman”

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prokopetz:

barnabasdeimos:

diglettdevious:

little-kitten-doll:

fast-and-fit:

THIS

To everyone who says it’s too expensive to eat on a budget. 

I love Twizzlers 

Where the fuck are you people buying your food that it costs so little?!

Note that virtually all of these price comparisons are complete horseshit. While it’s true that raw ingredients purchased in bulk can be cheaper than prepared or fast food, a naive price comparison doesn’t take into account a whole constellation of externalities, including:

  • Travel expenses. Grocery chains that sell raw ingredients in bulk often don’t have branches in or near low-income neighbourhoods, so the driving distance to reach one can be significant. If you have a low income, the gas you spend getting to and from the grocery store is a non-trivial component of your food’s total cost - and that’s assuming you own a car at all.
  • Storage expenses. Raw ingredients purchased in bulk need large amounts of storage space, and often that storage space needs to be refrigerated or climate-controlled. Many low-income households do not own large refrigerators or freezers, or cannot afford the electrical bills associated with keeping a large refrigerator or freezer running 24/7.
  • Preparation expenses. Raw ingredients purchased in bulk require appliances and tools to turn into edible food. Many low income households do not own a proper range or full-sized oven. Your food preparation options are sharply limited when all you have to work with is a microwave and a hot-plate - and, again, even if you do have a proper range and oven, actually using them incurs gas and electrical charges, which add to the real cost of your food.
  • Time. Driving to and from a distant grocery store takes time. Preparing food from raw ingredients takes time. This time expenditure can easily amount to hours per week - which is no particular impediment when you’re working a regular nine-to-five, but if you’re a single parent, or holding down multiple minimum-wage jobs with unpredictable schedules in order to make ends meet, that may well be time you don’t have. Plus, even if you can spare it, your time has monetary value (i.e., the time you’re spending purchasing and preparing food is time you’re not spending on any other productive endeavour), which again contributes to the real cost of your food.

Once all of these factors are properly taken into consideration, prepared and packaged food - and yes, sometimes even fast food - is indeed substantially less costly than purchasing raw ingredients in bulk and preparing your own food. Having the time, facilities, and convenience of access to prepare your own food from scratch every day is a luxury - and one that’s increasingly out of reach for many folks.

reblog if u ugly af and u admit it and accept it #2K14